Elbow Arthroscopy Provo | Biceps Tendon Repair Provo | Fillmore UT
  • Sports Medicine

  • Knee Surgery

  • Shoulder Surgery

  • Elbow Surgery

  • Hip Surgery

  • Ankle Surgery

  • Arthroscopic Surgery

Elbow

Elbow Arthroscopy

Elbow is the joint that connects the upper arm bone and the forearm bones. Elbow joint helps in moving of the arms forward, backward, as well as to twist the arms inside and outside.

For more information about Elbow Arthroscopy, click on below tabs.

Biceps Tendon Repair

The biceps muscle, located in the front of the upper arm allows you to bend the elbow and rotate the arm. Biceps tendons attach the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder and in the elbow.

Biceps tear can be complete or partial. Partial biceps tendon tears will not completely break the tendon. Complete tendon tears will break the tendon into two parts.

Find out more about Biceps Tendon Repair from the following links.

Olecranon (Elbow) Fractures

Three bones—humerus, radius, and ulna—make up the elbow joint. The bones are held together by ligaments thus providing stability to the joint. Muscles and tendons around the bones coordinate the movements and help in performing various activities. Elbow fractures may occur from trauma resulting from a variety of reasons, some of them being a fall on an outstretched arm, a direct blow to the elbow, or an abnormal twist to the joint beyond its functional limit.

Elbow Dislocation

The elbow is a hinge joint made up of 3 bones – humerus, radius and ulna. The bones are held together by ligaments to provide stability to the joint. Muscles and tendons move the bones around each other and help in performing various activities. Elbow dislocation occurs when the bones that make up the joint are forced out of alignment.

Snapping Hip Syndrome

The hip is an important joint that helps us walk, run and jump. The ball-and-socket joint in the hip is formed between the round end of the femur (thighbone) and the cup-shaped socket of the acetabulum (part of the hip bone). Joint stability in the hip region is achieved through the labrum (a strong fibrous cartilage), which covers the acetabulum and seals it, and ligaments (tissue connecting bone to bone) and tendons (tissue connecting muscle to bone) that encase the hip and control the hip movements.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopedic connection website of  American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.